Ready, Set, Let’s Go to Kindergarten!

September means backpacks, books, and back to school for kids. Four and five-year-old children may have attended preschool but this is their initial venture to “big kid” school. This may include a larger building, a first ride on a school bus, a longer school day, a new teacher, and meeting new children. Kindergarten is a big year in many areas—academic, social, physical, and emotional. Here are some tips to prepare your child for a great start.

countdownEarly to bed, easy to rise
Kindergarten-aged children need on average, 10-12 hours of sleep. Regular schedules and consistent bedtime routines promote healthy sleep habits. Sleep is essential for cognitive abilities such as learning, attention, memory, decision-making, reaction time, and creativity. Sleep also influences mood and behavior. A well-fed child who has had a healthy breakfast will be better prepared for a day of learning. Continue reading

Taming Middle School Madness: Getting Your Student Off to the Right Start

As September draws near, the lazy days of summer and joys of vacations and summer camps will soon be replaced with tweens and teens needing to manage the academic demands of middle school. This means balancing time with friends, extracurricular teams and activities, and schoolwork. Yes, schoolwork! Children everywhere are anticipating long hours of homework and time spent studying for exams. Implementing good habits early in the year will help improve academic performance and reduce stress at home. Here are some tips to share with your child to help get them off to a great start.

BoyLockerTransitions
Expect the initial transition back to school to be an adjustment period. Even if your child is returning to the same school, they will need to learn a new class schedule, understand the expectation of a new set of teachers, and respond to increasing academic demands. Listen to your child, be supportive, validate their feelings, and reinforce their ability to cope and problem-solve. Continue reading

Treating Speech And Language Difficulties With PROMPT Therapy

  • Does your child need to use repetition to make needs known?
  • Do others have trouble understanding your child’s speech?
  • Does your child have difficulty with articulation and making speech sounds?

PROMPT is a specialized technique, utilized by expertly trained speech and language pathologists to enhance speech production.

What is PROMPT therapy?
PROMPT (Prompts for Restructuring Oral Muscular Phonetic Targets) is a program designed to help individuals with varying speech difficulties produce sounds so they can articulate properly and interact verbally with others.

What makes PROMPT special?prompt
PROMPT uses physical cues to a child’s jaw, tongue, and lips (articulators) to manually guide them through a specific sound, word, phrase or sentence.  A speech and language pathologist may say to a child, “Let me show you how it feels,” so a child actually feels how his muscles should move. Continue reading

How To Sit In School

  • Does your child have difficulty sitting upright in a “crisscross applesauce” position
  • Does your child fidget constantly or have trouble sitting still?
  • Does the teacher complain that your child bumps into peers during circle time at school?

What is low tone?

A child with low tone may appear floppy with loose joints and display poor posture, attention, or alertness.  The child may be late learning to sit and walk, avoid typical childhood outdoor play such as monkey bars, appear cautious engaging in new physical activities, tire easily, or have difficulty with sustained posture in sitting, drawing, and handwriting. Continue reading